79. Asian children’s literature, film and animation (special issue of SARE, 2018)

In December 2018, the Southeast Asian Review of English (SARE vol. 55, no. 2) published a themed-issue on Asian children’s literature, film and animation. The journal is open access and there are some interesting papers relating to China.

cover_issue_1392_en_US

Click on the titles below to access the whole article. I’ve copied the titles, authors, and abstracts, and added links to the authors. I’ve also added a list of some of the authors’ previous publications at the end.
Continue reading

Advertisements

30. St Gregory’s School ‘Reading China’ book group – by Theresa Munford

Theresa  Munford teaches Chinese at a secondary school in the UK. She took the initiative a few years ago to set up a Chinese book group. At a symposium on Chinese children’s literature in 2016 she played a video in which she interviewed two of her teenage students about the Chinese books they had read. They spoke frankly and eloquently about the books they had read. We invited Theresa to tell us more about the bookclub… [This piece was written for the Global Literature in Libraries and Paper Republic collaboration, February 2017.]  Continue reading

29. One Child: The Story of China’s Most Radical Social Experiment – by Mei Fong

In October 2015 the Chinese government announced major changes to their population policy, commonly known as the One Child policy. Instead of curbs that limited one-third of Chinese households to strictly one child, Chinese families across the nation could have two children starting from 1 Jan 2016. With incredible timing, Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Mei Fong‘s book One Child was at the publishers! I was invited to review it for the Los Angeles Review of Books and found Mei Fong’s book very readable – there was a perfect balance of detailed research and stories of individual people in real circumstances.   Continue reading

7. A Brief History of Chinese Literature for Children, What Sells Now, and More

My last post focused on a single question posed by Marcia Lynx Qualey, initiator of #WorldKidLit Month (September). In fact, during our conversation, she asked more questions, and these went into a second blogpost on 30 September, a timely coincidence as 30 September is International Translation Day! Again, many thanks to Marcia for allowing me to cross-post the second piece here. Continue reading

3. Chinese children’s literature and the UK National Curriculum

We’re delighted that our first guest post is by Frances Weightman of the University of Leeds. On 2 July 2016 Frances and her team organised an excellent symposium on Chinese children’s literature, bringing together scholars, translators and teachers. There was a particular impetus for holding the symposium, in that the teaching of modern foreign languages – including Chinese – in UK schools is changing. In September 2013 the Department for Education issued new National Curriculum guidelines for the study of languages at primary and secondary schools in the UK, which places new emphasis on the study of literary texts within the curriculum. Continue reading